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(Vatican Radio) The Director of the Vatican Press Office Father Federico Lombardi said Pope Francis is an enthusiastic supporter of peace education in schools.  Father Lombardi was speaking at a press conference in the Vatican on Tuesday held to speak about the “Factory of Peace” project that has been launched by leading educational, political and generic levitra online pharmacy church figures to help schoolchildren realise the importance of peace and dialogue with others.  The press conference comes just days before a scheduled meeting between Pope Francis and seven thousand children  in the Vatican (on May 11th) to talk about the themes of peace, love, welcome and integration.   

Father Lombardi quoted Pope Francis’ words: “We will not change the world unless we change education” and said the Holy Father has reiterated the need to foster a “culture of encounter” which can then build a harmonious and peaceful world. Such an encounter is not “vague and abstract, but an invitation to genuinely meet real people in order to initiate a thorough exchange and therefore a common path to a better society.” Father Lombardi went on to stress that this message of encounter must be repeated over and http://extended-aftercare.com/canadian-pharmacies-for-viagra over again, in order to address world problems such as conflict, hardship, exclusion and the plight of migrants and refugees. He said the Pope is convinced that many of these problems can be traced back to a culture of waste, which itself stems from a selfish attitude.

Pope Francis has been leading the way in this endeavour long before his election as Pope. Whilst serving as Archbishop of Buenos Aires he founded the Scholas Occurentes organisation to promote networking between schools in different countries. The organisation uses sports, arts and technology to bring young people together and create a common bond.

(from Vatican Radio)

(Vatican Radio)  Tribulations, trust, and peace. These are the three words around which Pope Francis developed his homily at Tuesday morning’s Mass at the Santa Marta guesthouse in the Vatican. The Pontiff pointed out that the Christian does not have a "sadomasochistic attitude” when confronted with difficulties, but relies on the Lord with confidence and hope.

Listen to this report by Tracey McClure:

When St. Paul is persecuted, despite a thousand tribulations, he remains firm in his faith and encourages others to hope in the Lord. Pope Francis was inspired by the passage from the Acts of the Apostles, in the First Reading, to dwell on these three points: tribulations, trust and buy chinese herbal levitra peace – saying that to enter the Kingdom of God, one must "go through dark times, difficult times."

The Christian bears tribulations with courage

However, he warned, "this is not a sadomasochistic attitude", rather, it is "the Christian struggle" against the prince of this world who tries to tear us away "from the word of Jesus, from faith, from hope." "To endure the tribulations" is a phrase, the Pope pointed out, that the Apostle Paul uses frequently:

"'To bear': is more than being patient; it means to carry on one’s shoulders, to carry the weight of tribulation. And Christian life also has moments like that. But Jesus tells us: 'Have courage in that moment. I have overcome; you too will be victorious'. This first word enlightens us to go forward in the most difficult moments of life, those moments that make us suffer."

And after giving this advice, the Pope said, Paul "organizes that Church", "He prays over the priests, lays His hands on them and entrusts them to the Lord."

Rely on the Lord in troubled times

The second word: "entrust". A Christian, Pope Francis observed, “can face tribulations and even persecution by entrusting himself unto the Lord." Only He, the Pope stressed, “is able to give us strength, to give us perseverance in faith, to give us hope":

"To entrust something to the Lord, to entrust this difficult moment to the Lord, to entrust myself to the Lord, to entrust to the Lord our faithful, we priests, bishops, entrust to the Lord our families, our friends and say to the Lord: 'Take care of them; they are yours.' This is a prayer that we do not always say: the prayer of entrustment: 'Lord I entrust this to you; You help take care of it.’ It is a beautiful Christian prayer. It is 'the attitude of trust in the power of the Lord, and in the tenderness of God who is Father. "

When a person makes "this prayer" from the heart, the Pope added, then he feels it is entrusted to the Lord - he is certain: "He never disappoints.  Trials, reflected the Pope, make us suffer, but "trust in the Lord gives you hope and here comes in the third word: peace.”

The peace of the Lord strengthens the faith and hope

Pope Francis recalled what Jesus says as he leaves his disciples: "I leave you peace; I give you my peace." But, he emphasized, "not a peace, a simple peace of mind", but a peace that "goes within: a peace, too, that gives you strength, which reinforces what today we asked the Lord: our faith and our hope":

"Three words: tribulations, trust and peace. In life we ​​have to go down streets of tribulation but this is the law of life. But in those moments, [we must] rely on the Lord and He answers us with peace. This Lord who is Father loves us so much and never disappoints. Now we continue the Eucharistic celebration with the Lord, praying that He strengthen our faith and our hope, asking Him to give us the confidence to overcome our trials because He has overcome the world, and gives us all his peace. "

(from Vatican Radio)

(Vatican Radio)  Tribulations, trust, and peace. These are the three words around which Pope Francis developed his homily at Tuesday morning’s Mass at the Santa Marta guesthouse in the Vatican. The Pontiff pointed out that the Christian does not have a "sadomasochistic attitude” when confronted with difficulties, but relies on the Lord with confidence and hope.

Listen to this report by Tracey McClure:

When St. Paul is persecuted, despite a thousand tribulations, he remains firm in his faith and encourages others to hope in the Lord. Pope Francis was inspired by the passage from the Acts of the Apostles, in the First Reading, to dwell on these three points: tribulations, trust and peace – saying that to enter the Kingdom of God, one must "go through dark times, difficult times."

The Christian bears tribulations with courage

However, he warned, "this is not a sadomasochistic attitude", rather, it is "the Christian struggle" against the prince of this world who tries to tear us away "from the word of Jesus, from faith, from hope." "To endure the tribulations" is a phrase, the Pope pointed out, that the Apostle Paul uses frequently:

"'To bear': is more than being patient; it means to carry on one’s shoulders, to carry the weight of tribulation. And Christian life also has moments like that. But Jesus tells us: 'Have courage in that moment. I have overcome; you too will be victorious'. This first word enlightens us to go forward in the most difficult moments of life, those moments that make us suffer."

And after giving this advice, the Pope said, Paul "organizes that Church", "He prays over the priests, lays His hands on them and entrusts them to the Lord."

Rely on the Lord in troubled times

The second word: "entrust". A Christian, Pope Francis observed, “can face tribulations and even persecution by entrusting himself unto the Lord." Only He, the Pope stressed, “is able to give us strength, to give us perseverance in faith, to give us hope":

"To entrust something to the Lord, to entrust this difficult moment to the Lord, to entrust myself to the Lord, to entrust to the Lord our faithful, we priests, bishops, entrust to the Lord our families, our friends and say to the Lord: 'Take care of them; they are yours.' This is a prayer that we do not always say: the prayer of entrustment: 'Lord I entrust this to you; You help take care of it.’ It is a beautiful Christian prayer. It is 'the attitude of trust in the power of the Lord, and in the tenderness of God who is Father. "

When a person makes "this prayer" from the heart, the Pope added, then he feels it is entrusted to the Lord - he is certain: "He never disappoints.  Trials, reflected the Pope, make us suffer, but "trust in the Lord gives you hope and here comes in the third word: peace.”

The peace of the Lord strengthens the faith and hope

Pope Francis recalled what Jesus says as he leaves his disciples: "I leave you peace; I give you my peace." But, he emphasized, "not a peace, a simple peace of mind", but a peace that "goes within: a peace, too, that gives you strength, which reinforces what today we asked the Lord: our faith and our hope":

"Three words: tribulations, trust and peace. In life we ​​have to go down streets of tribulation but this is the law of life. But in those moments, [we must] rely on the Lord and He answers us with peace. This Lord who is Father loves us so much and never disappoints. Now we continue the Eucharistic celebration with the Lord, praying that He strengthen our faith and our hope, asking Him to give us the confidence to overcome our trials because He has overcome the world, and gives us all his peace. "

(from Vatican Radio)

Vatican City, 5 May 2015 (VIS) – This morning in the Holy See Press Office, Archbishop Salvatore Fisichella, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelisation, and Msgr. Graham Bell presented the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy (8 December 2015 to 20 November 2016).

The archbishop began, “The Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, which continues be the programmatic outline for the pontificate of Pope Francis, offers a meaningful expression of the very essence of the Extraordinary Jubilee announced on April 11: 'Such a community [the Church] has an endless desire to show mercy, the fruit of its own experience of the power of the Father’s infinite mercy. Let us try a little harder to take the first step and getting cialis to become involved'. It is with this desire in mind that we should re-read the Bull of Indiction of the Jubilee, Misericordiae vultus, in which Pope Francis details the aims of the Holy Year. As you know, the two dates already marked out are December 8,the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception – the day of the opening of the Holy Door of St. Peter’s Basilica – and November 20, 2016, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe, which will conclude the Holy Year. Between these two dates a calendar of various events is being developed.

“In order to avoid any misunderstanding, it is important to reiterate that this Jubilee of Mercy is not and does not intend to be the Great Jubilee Year of 2000. Therefore, any comparisons lack validity, for every Holy Year possesses its own unique nature and aims. It is the Pope’s desire that this Jubilee be celebrated in Rome as well as in the local Churches; this will give due focus to the life of individual Churches and their needs, in such a way that the initiatives will not place an extra burden on local Churches, but will blend into their calendars and usual activities very naturally. Also, for the first time in the history of the Jubilee tradition, there will be an opportunity for individual dioceses to open a Holy Door – the Door of Mercy – either in the Cathedral or in a church of special significance or a shrine of particular importance for pilgrimages. Similarly, it is easy to cull other characteristics from the Bull of Indiction that will make this Jubilee unique. From the very beginning, however, the call to mercy breaks with the traditional pattern. The history of Jubilees has been marked by their occurrence every 50 or 25 years. The two Extraordinary Jubilees fell on anniversaries of Christ’s redemptive act (1933, 1983). This Jubilee, however, is based upon a theme. It will build upon the central content of the faith and intends to call the Church once again to its missionary priority of being a sign and witness in every aspect of its pastoral life. I also have in mind Pope Francis’ appeal to Judaism and Islam as loci in which to contextualise the theme of mercy in order to foster dialogue and a way of overcoming difficulties in the public realm. We must also not forget another original characteristic of this Jubilee, namely, the designation of Missionaries of Mercy. Pope Francis will give them their mandate on Ash Wednesday during the celebration in St. Peter’s Basilica. The Missionaries must be patient priests, possessing an understanding of human frailty but ready to express the loving kindness of the Good Shepherd in their preaching and in the Sacrament of Confession. However, I would rather not spend too much time on these general questions, because it is important now to explain some of the specifics pertaining to the organisation of the Holy Year.

“We begin with the logo which represents a summa theologiae of the theme of mercy and the motto which accompanies it. The motto Merciful Like the Father (from the Gospel of Luke, 6:36) serves as an invitation to follow the merciful example of the Father who asks us not to judge or condemn but to forgive and to give love and forgiveness without measure. The logo is the work of Father Marko I. Rupnik. It is an image quite important to the early Church: that of the Son having taken upon His shoulders the lost soul, demonstrating that it is Christ's love that brings to completion the mystery of His incarnation culminating in redemption. The logo has been designed in such a way so as to express the profound way in which the Good Shepherd touches the flesh of humanity and does so with a love that has the power to change one’s life. One particular feature worthy of note is that while the Good Shepherd, in His great mercy, takes humanity upon Himself, His eyes are merged with those of man. Christ sees with the eyes of Adam, and Adam with the eyes of Christ. Every person discovers in Christ, the new Adam, his or her own humanity and the future that lies ahead. The scene is enclosed in a mandorla, an element typical of ancient and medieval iconography, that recalls the coexistence of the two natures, divine and human, in Christ. The three conc...

Vatican City, 5 May 2015 (VIS) – This morning in the Holy See Press Office, Archbishop Salvatore Fisichella, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelisation, and Msgr. Graham Bell presented the Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy (8 December 2015 to 20 November 2016).

The archbishop began, “The Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium, which continues be the programmatic outline for the pontificate of Pope Francis, offers a meaningful expression of the very essence of the Extraordinary Jubilee announced on April 11: 'Such a community [the Church] has an endless desire to show mercy, the fruit of its own experience of the power of the Father’s infinite mercy. Let us try a little harder to take the first step and to become involved'. It is with this desire in mind that we should re-read the Bull of Indiction of the Jubilee, Misericordiae vultus, in which Pope Francis details the aims of the Holy Year. As you know, the two dates already marked out are December 8,the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception – the day of the opening of the Holy Door of St. Peter’s Basilica – and November 20, 2016, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe, which will conclude the Holy Year. Between these two dates a calendar of various events is being developed.

“In order to avoid any misunderstanding, it is important to reiterate that this Jubilee of Mercy is not and does not intend to be the Great Jubilee Year of 2000. Therefore, any comparisons lack validity, for every Holy Year possesses its own unique nature and aims. It is the Pope’s desire that this Jubilee be celebrated in Rome as well as in the local Churches; this will give due focus to the life of individual Churches and their needs, in such a way that the initiatives will not place an extra burden on local Churches, but will blend into their calendars and usual activities very naturally. Also, for the first time in the history of the Jubilee tradition, there will be an opportunity for individual dioceses to open a Holy Door – the Door of Mercy – either in the Cathedral or in a church of special significance or a shrine of particular importance for pilgrimages. Similarly, it is easy to cull other characteristics from the Bull of Indiction that will make this Jubilee unique. From the very beginning, however, the call to mercy breaks with the traditional pattern. The history of Jubilees has been marked by their occurrence every 50 or 25 years. The two Extraordinary Jubilees fell on anniversaries of Christ’s redemptive act (1933, 1983). This Jubilee, however, is based upon a theme. It will build upon the central content of the faith and intends to call the Church once again to its missionary priority of being a sign and witness in every aspect of its pastoral life. I also have in mind Pope Francis’ appeal to Judaism and Islam as loci in which to contextualise the theme of mercy in order to foster dialogue and a way of overcoming difficulties in the public realm. We must also not forget another original characteristic of this Jubilee, namely, the designation of Missionaries of Mercy. Pope Francis will give them their mandate on Ash Wednesday during the celebration in St. Peter’s Basilica. The Missionaries must be patient priests, possessing an understanding of human frailty but ready to express the loving kindness of the Good Shepherd in their preaching and in the Sacrament of Confession. However, I would rather not spend too much time on these general questions, because it is important now to explain some of the specifics pertaining to the organisation of the Holy Year.

“We begin with the logo which represents a summa theologiae of the theme of mercy and the motto which accompanies it. The motto Merciful Like the Father (from the Gospel of Luke, 6:36) serves as an invitation to follow the merciful example of the Father who asks us not to judge or condemn but to forgive and to give love and forgiveness without measure. The logo is the work of Father Marko I. Rupnik. It is an image quite important to the early Church: that of the Son having taken upon His shoulders the lost soul, demonstrating that it is Christ's love that brings to completion the mystery of His incarnation culminating in redemption. The logo has been designed in such a way so as to express the profound way in which the Good Shepherd touches the flesh of humanity and does so with a love that has the power to change one’s life. One particular feature worthy of note is that while the Good Shepherd, in His great mercy, takes humanity upon Himself, His eyes are merged with those of man. Christ sees with the eyes of Adam, and Adam with the eyes of Christ. Every person discovers in Christ, the new Adam, his or her own humanity and the future that lies ahead. The scene is enclosed in a mandorla, an element typical of ancient and medieval iconography, that recalls the coexistence of the two natures, divine and human, in Christ. The three conc...

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